How to Make a Corsage

Beginning Assembly

Now that you have all the flowers, greens and ribbon wired and taped, it's time to begin assembling your corsage.  I like to plan out all my flower recipes in advance.  That way I know how many of each flower variety to prepare.

I usually make mother and grandmother corsages a little more elaborate than other wedding attendants - but be sure to scale every corsage for the size of the wearer.  Nothing is worse than a overly large corsage dwarfing the hand of a tiny candlelighter!  Same goes for larger women  - scale their flowers so they look appropriate on their wrists or shoulders.

Remember that the same principals work for all corsages - you can substitute other flowers or greens and use the same method of assembly.

Start with a smaller, tighter bud for the top of the corsage.

I place a wired pittosporum leaf behind the tight carnation bud and taped the two stems together.

I rarely tape down the entire stem - instead I cut away excessive wire, working to keep my corsage stem as slender and pliable as possible while still making sure they are tightly taped together.

Sharp heavy duty wire cutters are a must for cutting through stiff wires and tape.

You can see by a side view that the leaf extends slightly beyond the tip of the flower head.  The wired stems are going to come in handy as I later bend and manipulate the flower heads in the direction I want them to face.

Mix up your greens as you work your way down the corsage stem.  Keep a little loose, open space between the flowers.

I'm actually bending the ivy in an "S" curve so it can snug up against the carnation head.

Don't cover up your flowers - instead frame and enhance them with both greenery and filler flowers.

Keep the back of your corsage neat and flat so it can rest against the shoulder comfortably.

Keep the floral tape handy and always stretch in a downward pull, keeping it tight and taut.



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